The Australian Science Media Centre (AusSMC) supports the accurate reporting of science in the media and has occupied this critical space at the front-line since 2005.

The not-for-profit Centre works with around 1,600 journalists and 5,000 scientists and has no agenda other than to support the accurate reporting of science in the media for the benefit of the Australian public.

As an independent service for journalists, we help media outlets cover some of the biggest stories in the news - from climate, energy and natural disasters to diet, health, technology and space.

OUR HISTORY

The mainstream media is the most important source of information on science and technology for the Australian public, and yet the relationship between scientists and the media is often fraught and difficult. The AusSMC exists to support both scientists and journalists to ensure that the public has access to the best scientific evidence and expertise.

The idea to set up an Australian Science Media Centre (AusSMC) came from the Adelaide Thinkers in Residence program. The AusSMC is based on the successful UK Science Media Centre that was established in London in 2002.

The AusSMC was established as an independent, not-for-profit organisation in late 2005. The Centre is housed in the old Adelaide Stock Exchange building, refurbished and renamed the Science Exchange. The AusSMC is now one of six international SMCs (UK, Australia, NZ, Canada, Germany and the US).

In response to a demand from journalists, the AusSMC launched a breaking science news portal, Scimex (Science Media Exchange) in 2015 to provide the media with access to scientific expertise, independent expert reaction, multimedia and research stories from Australia and NZ. Scimex is now used by 1,600 journalists and distributes more than 3,000 stories each year.

STAFF

SMC GLOBAL NETWORK

There are now science media centres in five countries (UK, Australia, New ZealandCanadaGermany) with others being actively considered in a host of countries including Japan, Denmark, China, Norway, Italy, the US and Pakistan. The centres collaborate extensively on issues of global importance and are in the process of developing a global network that has the potential to become an international force for evidence-based science in the media.

More info on the international group of SMCs can be found here which includes a global charter.

There are now science media centres in five countries (UK, Australia, New ZealandCanadaGermany) with others being actively considered in a host of countries including Japan, Denmark, China, Norway, Italy, the US and Pakistan. The centres collaborate extensively on issues of global importance and are in the process of developing a global network that has the potential to become an international force for evidence-based science in the media.

More info on the international group of SMCs can be found here which includes a global charter.

There are now science media centres in five countries (UK, Australia, New ZealandCanadaGermany) with others being actively considered in a host of countries including Japan, Denmark, China, Norway, Italy, the US and Pakistan. The centres collaborate extensively on issues of global importance and are in the process of developing a global network that has the potential to become an international force for evidence-based science in the media.

More info on the international group of SMCs can be found here which includes a global charter.

There are now science media centres in five countries (UK, Australia, New ZealandCanadaGermany) with others being actively considered in a host of countries including Japan, Denmark, China, Norway, Italy, the US and Pakistan. The centres collaborate extensively on issues of global importance and are in the process of developing a global network that has the potential to become an international force for evidence-based science in the media.

More info on the international group of SMCs can be found here which includes a global charter.